Bioeconomics (fisheries)

Bioeconomics is étroitement related to the early development of theories in fisheries economics, INITIALLY in the mid-1950s by Canadian Economists Scott Gordon (in 1954) [1] and Anthony Scott (1955). Their ideas used recent achievements in biological fisheries modeling, Primarily the works by Schaefer (1957) we Establishing a formal relationship entre fishing activities and biological growth through mathematical modeling confirmed by empirical studies, and aussi porte Itself to ecology and the environment and resource protection. [2]


These ideas developed out of the multidisciplinary fisheries science environment in Canada at the time. Canadian fisheries researcher of various disciplines. Population modeling and fishing mortality were introduced to economists, and new interdisciplinary modeling became available to the economists, which made it possible to evaluate biological and economic impacts of different fishing activities and fisheries management decisions.

See also

  • Green economics
  • EconMult
  • Economics of biodiversity
  • Ecological economics
  • List of harvested aquatic animals by weight

Notes

  1. Jump up^ Gordon, H. Scott (1954). “The Economic Theory of a Common-Property Resource: The Fishery”. Journal of Political Economy . 62 (2): 124-142. doi : 10.1086 / 257497 . JSTOR  1825571 .
  2. Jump up^ Schaefer, MB (1957). “Some considerations of population dynamics and economics in relation to the management of marine fishes”. Journal of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada . 14 : 669-81. doi : 10.1139 / f57-025 .

References

  • Anderson LG and Seijo JC (2010) John Wiley and Sons Bioeconomics of Fisheries Management . ISBN  978-0-8138-1732-3 .
  • Seijo JC, Defeo O and Salas S (1998) Fisheries Bioeconomics: Theory, Modeling and Management FAO Fisheries, Technical Paper 368. ISBN  92-5-104045-1 .
  • Scott, A. (1955). “The Fishery: The Objectives of Sole Ownership”. Journal of Political Economy . 63 (2): 116-124. doi : 10.1086 / 257653 . JSTOR  1827047 .

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